News ID: 1053
A specialist at MSF presented an impressive testimony to what she saw as she watched the cholera news in Yemen, where the stressful work and the outbreaks at Abbass for measles, whooping cough and malaria were confirmed in her report: We treated war-wounded and cholera as our last concern.
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Publish Date: 08 August 2017

"All factors leading to the spread of cholera are present in Yemen in general and in particular, where the health system and doctors are wasting their wages, resources are limited and the poor people have minimal water and food,” expert Ruth Kunde said in a special report.

"In the beginning, cholera was intermittent in Abes. We had a limited number of patients who all came from the same area. However, it was clear to us at MSF that we had to work quickly so we conducted exploratory campaigns and established networks in We donated medical equipment and trained medical staff in health centers and facilities in the area to ensure that at least moderate cases were treated in remote areas.

In May, however, the situation exploded. We are receiving 20 to 30 patients per day, and further away. We sounded alarm bells and felt the situation was getting out of hand. We have doubled our efforts and established a cholera treatment center in a neighboring school. In addition, the hospital currently has 100 beds and we have recruited 100 additional health workers.

The international expert added that Abes is not the only one to have cholera in it, but the area where the disease spread as quickly as possible. The disease has killed more than 1,600 patients and infected more than 269,000 people. At the end of June we received an average of 400 potential patients With cholera every day.

"I have a feeling that the situation would have been catastrophic if MSF had not worked in Abes if we had not returned to this needy area in Yemen a few months after the hospital was bombed and concluded that Nabil and Yemen needed much greater effort and much better coordination With the humanitarian community. Time is in the tens of thousands of people. In fact, cholera is a warning call that will continue to resonate even after the last patient is treated.

The Guardian newspaper published a report highlighting the seriousness of the health situation in Yemen in light of the spread of the cholera epidemic. Yemen’s targeting of civilians and infrastructure directly is one of the reasons behind the outbreak of the epidemic. The report said that in the past four months Yemen has seen a cholera epidemic in its wake in what the United Nations described as the worst in the world in Fiumia is discovered seven thousand cases The total number of injured at the end of April was 436,625, more than 1,900 of whom died.

The newspaper said that the epidemic is one of the manifestations of the humanitarian disaster in which Yemen lives. In fact, two-thirds of the population needs urgent intervention at a time when food production is declining significantly and a large number of children and pregnant women suffer from malnutrition.

Cholera is spread through water contaminated with human waste for infected people. It is usually possible to prevent and treat this disease easily, especially in light of the development of living conditions in our time and provide the means of hygiene and safe drinking water in addition to access to drugs and treatment easily, which led to the reduction of cases of cholera.

Many parties, such as the United Nations agencies and the prestigious media such as the BBC and the New York Times, as well as well-known medical journals such as the Lancet, have all confirmed that the aggression and war Yemen has been living in for two years created the conditions for a cholera epidemic And spread.

The newspaper said that these statements are realistic and include part of the truth, but these did not address the whole truth as to who bears responsibility. The guilty party has been overlooked more than others.

Saudi Arabia has been leading an Arab alliance since March 2015 to bring Hadi’s government back to power. The Riyadh-led coalition relies on air strikes, as well as imposing an air and sea blockade on Yemen as well as deploying troops on the ground. Britain and the United States have provided logistical support and military equipment to fight this aggression.

The newspaper said that the Saudi warplanes launched several raids without distinguishing between the military and civilian targets, which led to the occurrence of many of the civilian casualties and targeted the raids infrastructure

Such as hospitals, farms, schools, water supply systems, markets and the main port of Hodeidah. In addition, Saudi Arabia imposed an air and sea blockade on areas under the control of Ansarullah, causing severe shortages of essential items such as food, fuel and medicine.

The newspaper said that no aircraft was allowed to enter the medical supplies to Sanaa only four weeks after the outbreak of the epidemic on the other hand, the government stopped paying the salaries of employees working in areas under the control of Ansarullah. Some 30,000 health workers have been deprived of their salaries for nearly a year. Meanwhile, sanitation workers and water engineers have been on strike in Sanaa for months, leaving garbage dumps on the streets of the city as water is suspended.

The areas under the control of Ansarullah are the most affected by the cholera outbreak. In fact, 80% of these cases were recorded in the provinces controlled by Ansarullah, where 17 of every 1,000 people in Al Mana are infected.


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